This is my portfolio, note that it does not display the realized profits nor bonds or cash waiting for the opportunity to be deployed. That amount is relatively high, thanks to realized gains on companies like Western Digital; Burlington Northern Santa Fe; and United States Gypsum. The accumulated profits on dividends or derivatives are not shown. It also does not show foreign exchange positions, like for example being at times net short or long on dollars, euros or other currencies. I therefore here disclose only my current stock and options investments.
Market quotes will be updated in 60 seconds.
To see the portfolio performance since 2006 click here.
Wise Investors Wanted - to share ideas - visit The Intelligent Investor Blog if you are interested !
GuruFocus Columnist
This portfolio page was specifically programed because there was no free tool that could do all this. It can be shared via a simple url. No login is required. It's fast. Never times out. USA and UK stock quotes have mostly less than a minute delay and quotes from other countries and options at most 20. Values can be shown in any currency (US$, Euro, Pound, Swiss Franc, etc). It updates itself alone every minute. It allows to build an international porfolio with stocks, options and long or short positions! Contact here.



"1. Does the company have products or services with sufficient market potential to make possible a sizable increase in sales for at least several years?"
-- Philip A. Fisher - "One of the Fifteen points to look for in a common stock"

The truly great man is he who would master no one, and who would be mastered by none.
-- Kahlil Gibran

Often, there is no correlation between the success of a company's operations and the success of its stock over a few months or even a few years. In the long term, there is a 100 percent correlation between the success of the company and the success of its stock. This disparity is the key to making money; it pays to be patient, and to own successful
-- Peter Lynch

"In the insurance business, there is no statute of limitation on stupidity."
-- Warren Buffett

"Berkshire's arbitrage activities differ from those of many arbitrageurs. First, we participate in only a few, and usually very large, transactions each year. Most practitioners buy into a great many deals perhaps 50 or more per year. With that many irons in the fire, they must spend most of their time monitoring both the progress of deals and the market movements of the related stocks. This is not how Charlie nor I wish to spend our lives. (What's the sense in getting rich just to stare at a ticker tape all day?)"
-- Warren Buffett

If you're not learning while you're earning, you're cheating yourself out of the better portion of your compensation.
-- Napoleon Hill

Fixable but unfixed bad performance is bad character and tends to create more of itself, causing more damage to the excuse giver with each tolerated instance.
-- Charlie Munger

"We've long felt that the only value of stock forecasters is to make fortune tellers look good. Even now, Charlie and I continue to believe that short-term market forecasts are poison and should be kept locked up in a safe place, away from children and also from grown-ups who behave in the market like children."
- At the bottom of the bear market in October 1974 a Forbes article interviewed Buffett. Buffett, for the first time in his life, made public prediction about the stock market.
-- Warren Buffett

The disadvantage of being in any kind of a market type environment - and Wall Street would be the extreme - is that you get over stimulated. You think you have to do something every day.
-- Warren Buffett

"If you think we are in trouble because the stock price went down, you don’t understand the situation"
-- Charlie Munger

"Given the recent terror and talk of war, we will focus on point two in this chapter.
2. Don’t be afraid of buying on a war scare.
At the conclusion of all actual fighting—regardless of whether it was World War I, World War II, or Korea—most stocks were selling at levels vastly higher than prevailed before there was any thought of war at all. Furthermore, at least ten times in the last twenty-two years, news has come of other international crises which gave threat of major war. In every instance, stocks dipped sharply on the fear of war and rebounded sharply as the war scare subsided.
War is always bearish on money. To sell a stock at the threatened or actual outbreak of hostilities so as to get into cash is extreme financial lunacy. Actually just the opposite should be done. If an investor has about decided to buy a particular common stock and the arrival of a full-blown war scare starts knocking down the price, he should ignore the scare psychology of the moment and definitely begin buying."
-- Philip A. Fisher - "One of the don'ts for investors"

"Sometimes you're outside your core competency. Level 3 is one of those times but I've made a bet on the people and I feel I understand the people. There was a time when people made a bet on me."
Oct. 2002, Warren Buffett, when questioned about his investment in Level 3
See also wikipedia on Level 3 Communications.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.'
-- Kahlil Gibran

It's not impossible to write [an accounting] footnote explaining deferred acquisition costs in life insurance or whatever you want to do. You can write it so you can understand it. If it's written so you can't understand it, I'm very suspicious. I won't invest in a company if I can't understand the footnote because I know they don't want me to understand it.
-- Warren Buffett

"We believe that according the name ‘investors’ to institutions that trade actively is like calling someone who repeatedly engages in one-night stands a ‘romantic’."
-- Warren Buffett

Too often, a vast collection of possessions ends up possessing its owner. The asset I most value, aside from health, is interesting, diverse, and long-standing friends.
-- Warren Buffett

“You only have to do a very few things right in your life so long as you don’t do too many things wrong.”
-- Warren Buffett

“We continue to adhere to a common-sense view of risk – how much we can lose and the probability of losing it. While this perspective may seem over simplistic or even hopelessly outdated, we believe it provides a vital clarity about the true risks in investing.”
-- Seth Klarman